Frequently Asked Questions
About Antique Stoves

Good Time Stove Services

Please visit our Heating Stove page to learn more.

You can place an order for a stove here, or purchase a stove online using this form.

Contact us for more information at 413-268-3677 or by filling out our contact form.

Please visit our Cook Stove page to learn more.

You can place an order for a stove here, or purchase a stove online using this form.

Contact us for more information at 413-268-3677 or by filling out our contact form.

Please visit our Conversions page to learn more.

Contact us for more information at 413-268-3677 or by filling out our contact form.

Please visit our Conversions page to learn more.

Contact us for more information at 413-268-3677 or by filling out our contact form.

We do NOT purchase stoves outright. We Sell Stoves on Consignment.  With consignments, you warehouse the stove while we seek a buyer. Payment for the stove is submitted when a buyer is found.  If this is an option appeals to you then we will need some specific information about your stove and photos.

Please visit our Sell a Stove page to learn more.

You can also submit this form or contact us for more information at 413-268-3677 or by filling out our contact form.

Crating a stove costs between $200 – $800 depending on the size and weight of the stove. The cost of shipping varies based on:

  • Delivery location (City and State)
  • Delivery to a residential address or a commercial address
  • Weight of stove

You can also contact us for a shipping quote at 413-268-3677 or by filling out our contact form.

We STRONGLY recommend you use the Driving Directions below.  We have found through experience that many GPS systems including GoogleMaps and MapQuest do not provide the best directions to our location.

Hours of Operation
Monday – Friday: 8:00 am – 4:00 pm
Saturday: 8:00 am to 2:00 pm
Sunday: Closed

Physical Address: 188 Cape St. (RT112) Goshen, MA 01032

If possible please call 24 hours before visiting, 413-268-3677

Driving Directions

FROM POINTS NORTH (Vermont)
Take I-91 South to Exit 25 – Deerfield (RT 116). Take a right onto RT 116 North. Turn left onto RT 112 South to Goshen. We are located just over the town line in Goshen. Good Time Stove Company is home to a well-known roadside attraction, the Tin Man of Goshen. You cannot miss our facility or the 16-foot tin man.

FROM POINTS NORTH-EAST (Maine, New Hampshire)
Take I-95 South. Merge onto I-495 South via Exit 59 toward Worcester. Merge onto MA-2 West via Exit 29B toward Leominster. Take the RT 2 West/RT 2A East exit, Exit 26, toward Greenfield Center/North Adams. Enter next roundabout and take 1st exit onto Mohawk Trail/RT 2. Turn right onto RT 112 South to Goshen. We are located just over the town line in Goshen. Good Time Stove Company is home to a well-known roadside attraction, the Tin Man of Goshen. You cannot miss our facility or the 16-foot tin man.

FROM POINTS SOUTH
Take I-91 North to Exit 19 – Northampton. Go straight through the light on Damon Road, follow until the road ends. Turn right on RT 9 heading West. Follow Route 9 West for approximately 10 miles into the town of Goshen. In the center of Goshen, you will see a white church on the left and a school and church on the right. After the library, take the second right onto RT112 North (also known as Cape Street). We are located 3 miles down the road on the right-hand side of the street. Good Time Stove Company is home to a well-known roadside attraction, the Tin Man of Goshen. You cannot miss our facility or the 16-foot tin man.

FROM POINTS EAST
Take I-90 West to I-91 North (Exit 4 on Mass. Pike). Take I-91 to exit 19 Northampton. Go straight through the light on Damon Road, follow until the road ends. Follow RT 9 West for approximately 10 miles into the town of Goshen. In the center of Goshen (after you pass the Whale Inn), you will see a white church on the left and a school and church on the right. After the library, take the second right onto RT112 North (also known as Cape Street). We are located 3 miles down the road on the right-hand side of the street. Good Time Stove Compay is home to a well-known roadside attraction, the Tin Man of Goshen. You cannot miss our facility or the 16-foot tin man.

FROM POINTS WEST
Take the Mass Pike I-90 West to Pittsfield, MA. In Pittsfield, follow RT 9 East through Dalton. You will go through Windsor Mountain and Cummington. You will then come into the town of Goshen. Turn left onto RT112 North or Cape Street. We are located 3 miles down the road on the right-hand side of the street. Good Time Stove Compay is home to a well-known roadside attraction, the Tin Man of Goshen. You cannot miss our facility or the 16-foot tin man.

Restoration

Ashes cleaned out from the stove or fireplace should be shoveled into a metal bucket with a metal lid, placed outside, on the ground, away from the building, to prevent fires. Do not place ashes into a paper bag or cardboard box. Ashed and embers can stay hot for days and ignite combustibles.

Blowers & Fans:  Hot Air Circulation
by Irwin L. Goodchild

The most common ways of heating air are by passing it by hot pipes, baseboard heaters, convectors, or so-called radiators. In each case the air being heated becomes lighter and slowly rises naturally to the ceiling.

The heated air then fills the top of a room. It does not descend to where people are until it cools and is replaced by more warmer air. As can be seen this is a slow way of moving heated air to where people are. In addition this way places the warmest air where it is most likely to lose heat through the ceiling and the surrounding upper walls.

Now, there are two ways to move the warm air at the ceiling more quickly down to where people are. One way is to have a forced hot air system and the other is to have a ceiling fan. The drawback to each of these ways is that the warmest air is still going to the ceiling first. It just does not stay there as long.

But note that there is a still better way to get the warmed air to people. That is to have a fan blow it horizontally toward the area where people are, — one to three feet above the floor. It does this most quickly and most cheaply with fan forced warm air.

Fan Forced Warm Air
There are several ways for fans to be used to blow warmed air horizontally one to three feet above the floor.

  1. The simplest, easiest, and cheapest would be for homeowners with forced hot air systems. They have only to buy deflectors for each of their hot air vents. The only caution is to be sure the blower system is not overloaded and for this one can check with their heater serviceman.
  2. The next simplest, easiest, and cheapest is to invest in fan forced portable electric heaters. The economy of purchase, installation and operation and the convenience of portability go a long way toward making up for the cost of electricity. The cautions obviously are to be sure your electric outlets will supply 1500 watts safely. Use no more than one heater per outlet. Be sure no fire hazards exist, and be sure that local regulations are met. The method does have its adherents.
  3. For homes using steam, hot water, or electric baseboard heaters the idea is simple. Have an electric fan blow air across, along, or through the heater when the heat comes on. The way to do it is not simple. Placing a fan at each heater is no problem. What is a problem is how to have the fan run when, and only when, the heater is on. Two methods best duplicate the advantages of fan forced portable electric heaters. One uses fan forced propane or natural gas heaters which are permanently installed along one or more walls of each room. The other method is to use electric fan forced heaters installed in or on room walls. The only change is to swap the practicality of fixed installation for the convenience of portable heaters.
  4. Propane or natural gas fan forced heaters have the advantages of piping in for combustion air from outside and piping the spent gases back to the outside. This eliminates outside air mixing with inside air and cooling it. It eliminates the need for a chimney and the chimney’s construction and maintenance costs. Their drawback is that their purchase and installation costs are not cheap.

Electric fan forced wall heaters are most similar to fan forced electric portable heaters. Their purchase costs are low and their installation costs are, too. The particular economy of fan forced electric heat far outways the cost of electricity as a heat source.

Simply Put

  • Fan forced heat is the most direct heat distribution system.
  • Fan forced heat has the most positive “on” control with minimal delay in starting. In the case of electrical heat there is no significant overshooting when the thermostat calls for shut off.
  • Because of A. and B. above there is no need to heat rooms not in use for it takes only minutes to make a room comfortable.
  • The significance of the economy and the comfort of fan forced heat outweighs all other ways for distributing heat.

Addendum

  • Radiant heat has the particular advantage of warm floors but it is not a distribution system where time is important for starting – or where overheating can be stopped quickly. The amount of flooring controls these things and economy of operation can be diminished. Conduction of heat through floors and air is a limiting factor and with any significant temperature rise in a floor the heat loss to the ceiling by true radiation can become a factor.
  • Plans for any new heating system should have as a priority careful attention to the amount of insulation planned for or in place already. If there is any question of what to do first, always insulate first and then install an appropriately sized heating system.
  • With sufficient insulation in the walls, modem windows of modest size, and the distribution of heat by fan forced heaters there should be little concern about the former practice of having heaters placed along outer walls to limit cold drafts from these walls. This is not to say that window insulation would not be advantageous.

We do NOT sell conversion kits. All of our conversions are custom-build for each individual stove.

We can convert any stove to gas, propane and electric. Customize conversion options and configurations to suit your family’s unique needs and interests.

Most chimney fires occur due to a build-up of creosote, a tarry by-product if burning wood. Have your chimney flue cleaned before each heating season. Burn only dry, well-seasoned, hardwood to reduce creosote accumulation.

Most fire extinguishers display symbols to show the kind of fire on which they are to be used. There are also multi-purpose fire extinguishers – such as those labeled “B-C” or “A-B-C” – that can be used on two or more of the below type fires.

Types of Fire Extinguishers

  1. Class A extinguishers put out fires in ordinary combustible materials such as cloth, wood, rubber, paper, and many plastics.     Ordinary Combustibles
  2. Class B extinguishers are used on fires involving flammable liquids, such as grease, gasoline, oil, and oil-based paints.     Flammable Liquids
  3. Class C extinguishers are suitable for use on fires involving appliances, tools, or other equipment that is electrically energized or plugged in.     Electrical Equipment
  4. Class D extinguishers are designed for use on flammable metals and are often specific for the type of metal in question. These are typically found only in factories working with these metals.     Combustible Metals
  5. Class K fire extinguishers are intended for use on fires that involve vegetable oils, animal oils, or fats in cooking appliances. These extinguishers are generally found in commercial kitchens, such as those found in restaurants, cafeterias, and caterers. Class K extinguishers are now finding their way into the residential market for use in kitchens.     Combustible Cooking


Is the fire at a point where it might still be controlled by a fire extinguisher?

Portable fire extinguishers are valuable for immediate use on small fires. They contain a limited amount of extinguishing material and need to be properly used so that this material is not wasted. For example, when a pan initially catches fire, it may be safe to turn off the burner, place a lid on the pan, and use an extinguisher. By the time the fire has spread, however, these actions will not be adequate. Only trained firefighters can safely extinguish such fires.

Use a fire extinguisher only if:

  1. You have alerted other occupants and someone has called the fire department.
  2. The fire is small and contained to a single object, such as a wastebasket.
  3. You are safe from the toxic smoke produced by the fire.
  4. You have a means of escape identified and the fire is not between you and the escape route.
  5. Your instincts tell you that it is safe to use an extinguisher.

If all of these conditions are not present, you should NOT try to use a fire extinguisher. Alert other occupants, leave the building following your home escape plan, go to the agreed upon meeting place, and call the fire department from a cell phone or a neighbor’s home.

Am I physically capable of using the extinguisher?

Some people have physical limitations that might diminish or eliminate their ability to properly use a fire extinguisher. People with disabilities, older adults, or children may find that an extinguisher is too heavy to handle or it may be too difficult for them to exert the necessary pressure to operate the extinguisher.

Maintenance & Training

  • The extinguisher is not blocked by furniture, doorways, or any thing that might limit access in an emergency.
  • The pressure is at the recommended level. Some extinguishers have gauges that indicate when the pressure is too high or too low.
  • All parts are operable and not damaged or restricted in any way. Make sure hoses and nozzles are free of insects or debris. There should not be any signs of damage or abuse, such as dents or rust, on the extinguisher.
  • The outside of the extinguisher is clean. Remove any oil or grease that might accumulate on the exterior.
  • Shake dry chemical extinguishers once a month to prevent the powder from settling or packing. Check the manufacturer’s recommendations.
  • Pressure test the extinguisher (a process called hydrostatic testing) after a number of years to ensure that the cylinder is safe to use. Find out from the owner’s manual, the label, or the manufacturer when an extinguisher may need this type of testing.
  • Immediately replace the extinguisher if it needs recharging or is damaged in any way.

Sound Decision Making, Training, and Maintenance are required to safely control a fire with an extinguisher. For this reason, USFA recommends that only those trained in the proper use and maintenance of fire extinguishers consider using them when appropriate. Contact your local fire department for information on training in your area.

*Information taken from US Fire Administration: http://www.usfa.fema.gov

This article is taken from the book Rediscovering The Woodburning Cookstove written and Illustrated by Robert Bobrowski. A standard water reservoir can hold 3 to 9 gallons of hot water. If this is not sufficient, there are ways to enlarge the hot water supply the most common being the attachment of the water tank to the stove.

A copper or galvanized iron 30-gallon upright tank stands to one side of the stove. In the back of the firebox you will find an extension with two pipes. One pipe accommodates a cold water supply pipe while the other provides an exit for hot water.
A standard water reservoir can hold 3 to 9 gallons of hot water. If this is not sufficient, there are ways to enlarge the hot water supply the most common being the attachment of the water tank to the stove.

A copper or galvanized iron 30-gallon upright tank stands to one side of the stove. In the back of the firebox you will find an extension with two pipes. One pipe accommodates a cold water supply pipe while the other provides an exit for hot water.
 
 
Water enters the top of the tank (hopefully by gravity feed). A pipe runs down the inside the tank to within 2 inches of the bottom. The cold water on the bottom of the tank feeds into the coils in the firebox and rises out of the stove as heated water. The hot water enters the tank above the cold water and is now available to go out to it’s destination.

If the source of cold water is higher than the tank, be it a spring on a hill or an overhead extension supplied by rainwater or pump, then the heated water will rise towards that level by natural pressure. Such pressure allows the water to be directed to an upstairs or downstairs tap by means of standard plumbing pipes.

Brass pipe coil is fit into the firebox by replacing the lining on one side. The channels in this arrangement follow the lines that the water in the pipes would follow.

Paint
High quality specially formulated flat black paint resists peeling and blistering when subjected to temperatures up to 1200 degrees Fahrenheit. Renews and protects the finish on steel or cast iron. Dries Fast! Perfect for cast iron stoves, barbecue grills, stainless steel pipe and chimney caps.

Cleaning Agents
A safe strong non-scratching formula that removes baked on smoke, soot, creosote, carbon and mineral residues from glass, stainless steel, chrome, aluminum, ceramic range tops, and porcelain/tile surfaces. Use to clean glass on fireplace inserts and door glass on coal, oil and wood burning stoves. Can also be used on fiberglass showers to remove soap scum. Leaves a protective silicone layer to make the next cleaning easier.

Non-abrasive White Off glass cleaning cream is specially formulated to remove white residue caused by gas log fires on glass fireplace doors. It cleans without scratching or micro-pitting. Great for cleaning glass-ceramic cooktops, composite sinks and fiberglass showers. Also safe for use on glass-ceramic wood stove windows.

Good Time Stove Co. does not sell parts or conversion kits.

Online Resources

Local Resources

Antique shops and stores in your area. Look in the phone book under “Antiques” and also “Appliances.” Do a local business search on Google maps by using these categories. Call stores and inquire as to whether they buy antique stoves. You can arrange for someone from the store to drop by your home, or you can bring the stove to the shop.

Antique shows: Bring photos and model/make information with you. Chat up vendors to see if they might be interested in buying your stove. If they’re not, chances are they’ll know someone who might be.

Do It Yourself Restoration Guide

There’s new life in that old stove

Antique wood-burning cook stoves and heaters—exquisitely restored to their original elegance—are making a comeback . . . both as tools to cook vittles or heat houses and as investments whose values recently have run well ahead of inflation.

  1. REMOVE THE NICKEL (OR BRASS OR COPPER) TRIM that can be detached from your stove. (That’ll usually be all the brightwork from heaters, but—again—the trim is a working part of some cookstoves. ) Bolts are apt to be rusted, so use lots of Liquid Wrench to help loosen stubborn ones. Rivets and bolts that won’t submit to logical persuasion will yield to a hammer and chisel. Replace both hex heads and rivets with brass bolts because they’re easier to install than rivets and look nice with nickel.
  2. REJUVENATE THE DETACHED TRIM. Polish the trim with Brasso and 0-gauge steel wool until all the crud is gone. Then give the metal a second shining with another shot of polishing juice and a soft cloth.
  3. If the trim is beyond reconditioning, you’ll have to have it replated. Find a metal plater in the Yellow Pages and arrange for the work to be done. (Most platers prefer that you not remove the rust before bringing in your to-be-refurbished piece.) By the way, if the decorative metal is copper or brass—and you plan to use the stove for more than just eyeballing—consider replating the pieces with nickel. The harder metal is more resistant to oxidation. And don’t settle for chrome! It’ll start turning blue with your first hot fire.
  4. REMOVE ISINGLASS WINDOWS AND FRAMES.
  5. REMOVE RUST FROM:
    • Stoves with trim detached: If all the ornamentation can be removed from your stove, the best way to derust is to have the surface sandblasted. But not with sand . . . it’s far too coarse. Instead, you’ll want the blasting done with carborundum crystals. Look for this service in the Yellow Pages under “monument works” .. . since carborundum is used to polish gravestones. Or find someone under “sandblasting” who uses the finer abrasive. Have only the exterior of heaters blasted . . . but if it’s a cookstove you’re rehabilitating, let the “polisher” blast the oven, too. (Poor of Curly needed a scouring, and paid a $30 visit to the monument-maker.) Of course, if you’re dead set against spending money, you can attack rust with a coarse rotary wire brush on your electric drill (be sure to protect your eyes!) but it’ll be miserable work.
    • Stoves with trim attached:  The easiest way to remove rust—without damaging shiny alloy trim—is to have the stove dipped in a heated chemical bath by an antique-auto stripper. He’ll return it to you spotlessly clean (unless it was rusted worse than you thought . . . in which case you’ll get back something as full of holes as a politician’s 1040 form). There might be a little new corrosion where the chemical didn’t dry immediately, but you can get that off with the wire brush and electric drill. And—while you’re at it—you might as well do the oven, too.
    • Stoves with porcelain trim:  Assuming that the ceramic parts won’t come off—and they usually won’t—you’ll have to go after rusted metal with that coarse rotary wire brush and electric drill. Porcelain won’t tolerate dipping or sandblasting, but it will spruce up nicely with a basin-tub-and-tile cleaner and a wet sponge.
  6. POLISH THE REMAINING BRIGHTWORK with Brasso and a soft cloth. If there’s any lingering crud, use another wad of 0-gauge steel wool for the first pass.
  7. PAINT THE OVEN of your cook stove with stainless steel paint.
  8. PAINT OR POLISH EXTERIOR STOVE PARTS, but protect the trim! Any cast-iron cooking surfaces should only be polished. On other areas you may interchange paint and polish as you choose.
  9. REPLACE ANY TRIM THAT WAS REMOVED.
  10. REPLACE ISINGLASS WINDOWS. Isinglass—which is made from the soft mineral, mica—is easy to work with. Just cut it to size with a pair of scissors.
  11. GIVE THE WOOD-BURNER A FINAL TOUCH UP with a soft cloth before standing back for a look-see. If the sun’s shining . . . watch your eyes!

Use a fireplace screen to prevent flying sparks and embers from falling out onto the floor.

Installation

A building permit must be obtained prior to the installation of fireplaces, wood or coal burning stoves. They must be inspected by the local building inspector prior to their initial use as required by the Massachusetts State Building Code.

Installation guidelines described on this page have been provided by the National Fire Protection Association. The NFPA standards are the basis for many local codes.

Wood or Coal Cooking Stove

Locate wood or coal cooking stoves a minimum of 36 inches from unprotected woodwork and other combustible materials or furniture or 18 inches from non-combustible walls. The addition of a heat shield or other protective devices, to the wall or the stove, allows a reduction of those distances by 50% allowing for an installation 18 inches from a combustible wall and 9 inches from a noncombustible wall. The wood-burning stove needs to be vented through a class-A, double-walled chimney.

Gas or Propane Cooking Stoves

An antique cooking stove that has been set up with gas does not require any clearance space. The stove is completed insulated and emits no heat. These stoves do not need to be vented. Set ups to Propane (LPG) and Natural Gas available on all models.

Electric Cooking Stoves

A cook stove with an electric set up does not require any clearance space. The stove is completed insulated and emits no heat. These stoves do not need to be vented. Set ups include standard 220 Volts, 50 AMPS.

Contact us for more information at 413-268-3677 or by filling out our contact form.

Installation guidelines described on this page provided by the National Fire Protection Association. The NFPA standards are the basis for many local codes.

Wood or Coal Heating Stoves
Wood-burning stoves must be located a minimum of 36 inches from unprotected woodwork and other combustible materials or furniture or 18 inches from non-combustible walls. The addition of a heat shield or other protective devices, to the wall or the stove, allows a reduction of those distances by 50%. This allows for an installation 18 inches from a combustible wall and 9 inches from a noncombustible wall. Wood-burning stoves needs to be vented through a class-A, double-walled chimney.

Gas or Propane Heating Stoves
An antique heating stove with a gas conversion must conform to the clearances for a wood-burning stove (above). The converted heating stove needs to be vented. This is done through a class-B, single-walled chimney. Set ups to Propane (LPG) and Natural Gas available on all models. With a gas conversion the total BTU ranges from 20,000 to 35,000.

Electric Heating Stoves
The electric converted heating stove does NOT need to be vented. 5,000 watt or 18,000 BTUs. 220 volt. 30 amp.

Contact us for more information at 413-268-3677 or by filling out our contact form.

Flue
Solid fuel heating appliances cannot share a common flue with chimney flues utilized by other solid fuel, fossil fuel or gas fire appliances.

Dampers
Check that the damper is open before lighting the fire. Failure to do so can result in an accumulation of of smoke and carbon monoxide in the home. Do not close the damper before the fire has died out and the embers are cold.

Inspection by Qualified Mason
Have the chimney and flue inspected by a qualified mason prior to use. Cracks in the flue or mortar joints can allow flames and heated gases to extend into the structure.

Distance between Floor and Base of Stove

Recommended Protection

Distance between Floor and Base of Stove

Stove has less than 2 inches of open space beneath the fire chamber or base.

Recommended Protection

May not be placed on floors of combustible construction.

Distance between Floor and Base of Stove

Stove has 2 to 6 inches of open space beneath the tire chamber or base.

Recommended Protection

Protect combustible floors with 4 inches of hollow masonry block, laid with ends unsealed and joints matched to allow air circulation. The masonry must extend 18 inches on all sides of the unit and be covered with 24-gauge sheet metal.

Distance between Floor and Base of Stove

Stove has legs that provide over 6 inches of open space beneath the fire chamber or base.

Recommended Protection

Protect combustible floors with 2 inches thick closely spaced brick, concrete or stone. The masonry must extend 18 inches on all sides of the appliance and be covered by 24-gauge sheet metal.

Adapted from the American National Standard ANSI/NFPA 2 1 1, Feb. 1984

 

Roof Slope
Height (Feet)
Height (Meters)
Flat to 6/12
1.25 ft
1.25 ft
6/12 to 7/12
1.25 ft
.38 m
7/12 to 8/12
1.5 ft
.46 m
8/12 to 9/12
1.75 ft
.61 m
9/12 to 10/12
2.50 ft
.61 m
10/12 to 11/12
3.25 ft
.99 m
11/12 to 12/12
4.0 ft
1.22 m
12/12 to 14/12
5.0 ft
1.52 m
14/12 to 16/12
6.0 ft
.1.83 m
16/12 to 18/12
7.0 ft
2.13 m
18/12 to 20/12
7.5 ft
2.27 m
20/12 to 21/12
8.0 ft
2.44 m

Smoke Alarms
Install and maintain smoke and carbon monoxide detectors to provide protection for your family.

Fire Extinguishers
Consider the following three questions before purchasing or using a fire extinguisher to control a fire:

1. What type of fire extinguisher is needed?

Different types of fires require different types of extinguishers. For example, a grease fire and an electrical fire require the use of different extinguishing agents to be effective and safely put the fire out. Basically, there are five different types of extinguishing agents. Most fire extinguishers display symbols to show the kind of fire on which they are to be used. There are also multi-purpose fire extinguishers – such as those labeled “B-C” or “A-B-C” – that can be used on two or more of the below type fires.

Types of Fire Extinguishers

  1. Class A extinguishers put out fires in ordinary combustible materials such as cloth, wood, rubber, paper, and many plastics.     Ordinary Combustibles
  2. Class B extinguishers are used on fires involving flammable liquids, such as grease, gasoline, oil, and oil-based paints.     Flammable Liquids
  3. Class C extinguishers are suitable for use on fires involving appliances, tools, or other equipment that is electrically energized or plugged in.     Electrical Equipment
  4. Class D extinguishers are designed for use on flammable metals and are often specific for the type of metal in question. These are typically found only in factories working with these metals.     Combustible Metals

Class K fire extinguishers are intended for use on fires that involve vegetable oils, animal oils, or fats in cooking appliances. These extinguishers are generally found in commercial kitchens, such as those found in restaurants, cafeterias, and caterers. Class K extinguishers are now finding their way into the residential market for use in kitchens. Combustible Cooking

2. Is the fire at a point where it might still be controlled by a fire extinguisher?

Portable fire extinguishers are valuable for immediate use on small fires. They contain a limited amount of extinguishing material and need to be properly used so that this material is not wasted. For example, when a pan initially catches fire, it may be safe to turn off the burner, place a lid on the pan, and use an extinguisher. By the time the fire has spread, however, these actions will not be adequate. Only trained firefighters can safely extinguish such fires.

Use a fire extinguisher only if:

  • You have alerted other occupants and someone has called the fire department.
  • The fire is small and contained to a single object, such as a wastebasket.
  • You are safe from the toxic smoke produced by the fire.
  • You have a means of escape identified and the fire is not between you and the escape route.
  • Your instincts tell you that it is safe to use an extinguisher.

If all of these conditions are not present, you should NOT try to use a fire extinguisher. Alert other occupants, leave the building following your home escape plan, go to the agreed upon meeting place, and call the fire department from a cell phone or a neighbor’s home.

3. Am I physically capable of using the extinguisher?

Some people have physical limitations that might diminish or eliminate their ability to properly use a fire extinguisher. People with disabilities, older adults, or children may find that an extinguisher is too heavy to handle or it may be too difficult for them to exert the necessary pressure to operate the extinguisher.

Maintenance & Training

  • The extinguisher is not blocked by furniture, doorways, or any thing that might limit access in an emergency.
  • The pressure is at the recommended level. Some extinguishers have gauges that indicate when the pressure is too high or too low.
  • All parts are operable and not damaged or restricted in any way. Make sure hoses and nozzles are free of insects or debris. There should not be any signs of damage or abuse, such as dents or rust, on the extinguisher.
  • The outside of the extinguisher is clean. Remove any oil or grease that might accumulate on the exterior.
  • Shake dry chemical extinguishers once a month to prevent the powder from settling or packing. Check the manufacturer’s recommendations.
  • Pressure test the extinguisher (a process called hydrostatic testing) after a number of years to ensure that the cylinder is safe to use. Find out from the owner’s manual, the label, or the manufacturer when an extinguisher may need this type of testing.

Immediately replace the extinguisher if it needs recharging or is damaged in any way.

Sound Decision Making, Training, and Maintenance are required to safely control a fire with an extinguisher. For this reason, USFA recommends that only those trained in the proper use and maintenance of fire extinguishers consider using them when appropriate. Contact your local fire department for information on training in your area.

*Information taken from US Fire Administration: http://www.usfa.fema.gov

The 36″ clearance between the stove and combustibles can be reduced considerably if the walls and ceilings are protected with mineral fiber, masonry, or 24 gauge sheet metal spaced out 1 inch from the combustible wall. The space allows air to circulate behind the panel to cool the wall. The spacers must be made of non-combustible material, such as a stack of washers, small diameter pipe, electrical conduit or tubing. Ceramic fence insulators, stacked washers, or a small-diameter pipe will work well, but don’t use copper or aluminum because it will conduct too much heat. Click here for a chart of the National Fire Protection Association’s suggestions for wall protection.

Nail or screw the panel to the wall studs through the hole in the center of the spacer. Use a screw and spacer every 16 inches horizontally and vertically, but do not use any directly behind the stove or connector. Mount the panel 2 inches off the floor, leaving the top and bottom edges open to allow for air circulation.

Protection Materials

Recommended Clearance from Walls

Recommended Clearance from Ceiling

Protection Materials

None

Recommended Clearance from Walls

36 inch

Recommended Clearance from Ceiling

36 inch

Protection Materials

3 1/2 inch thick Masonry (brick) wall without ventilated air space

Recommended Clearance from Walls

24 inch

Recommended Clearance from Ceiling

Does not Apply

Protection Materials

1/2 inch thick non-combustible insulation board over 1″ mineral wool batts, without ventilated air space

Recommended Clearance from Walls

18 inch

Recommended Clearance from Ceiling

24 inch

Protection Materials

24-gauge sheet metal with or without insulated backing and with ventilated air space

Recommended Clearance from Walls

12 inch

Recommended Clearance from Ceiling

24 inch

Protection Materials

3 1/2 inch thick masonry (brick) wall with ventilated air space

Recommended Clearance from Walls

12 inch

Recommended Clearance from Ceiling

Does not Apply

Protection Materials

1/2 inch thick non-combustible insulation board with ventilated air space

Recommended Clearance from Walls

12 inch

Recommended Clearance from Ceiling

18 inch

Adapted from the American National Standard ANSI/NFPA 2 1 1, Feb. 1984

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