Hot Water Systems

This article is taken from the book Rediscovering The Woodburning Cookstove written and Illustrated by Robert Bobrowski. A standard water reservoir can hold 3 to 9 gallons of hot water. If this is not sufficient, there are ways to enlarge the hot water supply the most common being the attachment of the water tank to the stove.

A copper or galvanized iron 30-gallon upright tank stands to one side of the stove. In the back of the firebox you will find an extension with two pipes. One pipe accommodates a cold water supply pipe while the other provides an exit for hot water.

A standard water reservoir can hold 3 to 9 gallons of hot water. If this is not sufficient, there are ways to enlarge the hot water supply the most common being the attachment of the water tank to the stove.

A copper or galvanized iron 30-gallon upright tank stands to one side of the stove. In the back of the firebox you will find an extension with two pipes. One pipe accommodates a cold water supply pipe while the other provides an exit for hot water.

Water enters the top of the tank (hopefully by gravity feed). A pipe runs down the inside the tank to within 2 inches of the bottom. The cold water on the bottom of the tank feeds into the coils in the firebox and rises out of the stove as heated water. The hot water enters the tank above the cold water and is now available to go out to it’s destination.

If the source of cold water is higher than the tank, be it a spring on a hill or an overhead extension supplied by rainwater or pump, then the heated water will rise towards that level by natural pressure. Such pressure allows the water to be directed to an upstairs or downstairs tap by means of standard plumbing pipes.

Brass pipe coil is fit into the firebox by replacing the lining on one side. The channels in this arrangement follow the lines that the water in the pipes would follow.